Currency

All of the World’s Money and Markets in One Visualization

In the current economic circumstances, there are some pretty large numbers being thrown around by both governments and the financial media.

The U.S. budget deficit this year, for example, is projected to hit $3.8 trillion, which would be more than double the previous record set during the financial crisis ($1.41 trillion in FY2009). Meanwhile, the Fed has announced “open-ended” asset-buying programs to support the economy, which will add even more to its current $7 trillion balance sheet.

Given the scale of these new numbers—how can we relate them back to the more conventional numbers and figures that we may be more familiar with? CLICK for complete article

The Fed Is Printing Money At Unprecedented Levels

“I think there is a strong likelihood we will need another bill.”

That’s according to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, who supports additional fiscal stimulus to combat the economic impact of the novel coronavirus—within reason.

The secretary’s statement comes after the House passed a record-shattering $3 trillion relief package, though leaders in the Senate have said they will not put it up for a vote. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has made it clear that the next coronavirus bill “cannot exceed $1 trillion,” according to reporting by Axios.

Even so, the U.S. government’s response is already massive, dwarfing anything that’s come before it.

Across the pond, Britain’s government is likewise spending like crazy. The U.K. budget deficit widened to a record 62.1 billion pounds ($76 billion) in the month of April, equal to the government’s total borrowing in 2019, according to Bloomberg. CLICK for complete article

Bitcoin Retakes $9K — 3 Technical Reasons There’s Still Room to Run

The price of Bitcoin surges above $9,000 ahead of a Goldman Sachs client call about gold and BTC.

The price of Bitcoin (BTC) surged above $9,000, demonstrating a decent recovery in the last 24 hours. Market data shows a further upsurge to the $9,300 to $9,400 range is likely in the near-term.

Three key reasons increase the probability of a minor rally: liquidation of 25x to 50x shorts are at $9,300, whales using the Goldman Sachs narrative and low funding rates in the futures market…CLICK for complete article

Coronavirus Has Put Bitcoin’s Safe Haven Narrative to the Test

The price of Bitcoin (BTC) suffered a tremendous crash on March 12, falling from almost $8,000 to stabilize at around $5,000, a loss of about 40% in the span of less than two days. This happened in the context of a global sell-off in all equity markets, where United States stock market indices such as the Dow Jones Industrial Average and the S&P 500 lost around 10% in a single day — a substantial loss for traditional markets.

Some were quick to decree the end of the narrative that Bitcoin is a safe haven asset, sometimes called a store of value, while others pointed to the fact that even gold fell during the bloodbath….CLICK for complete article

Bitcoin Disappoints As ‘Safe Haven’ Asset Amid Coronavirus Meltdown

Any safe haven asset worth its salt is supposed to rise and shine when all hell breaks loose in the financial markets, providing an escape hatch from market turmoil. Going by that criterion alone, bitcoin and the crypto markets have failed investors miserably during the ongoing COVID-19 crisis.

Last month’s epic collapse by bitcoin and the rest of the crypto universe eclipsed the equity markets selloff and seriously undercut crypto’s safe haven credentials. Instead of buying more bitcoin as cities and entire countries went into total lockdown, the coronavirus outbreak just proved how much people value cash–and toilet paper.

Investors rushed to liquidate their financial assets–including cryptocurrencies– en masse and stockpiled on huge rolls, leading to bitcoin crashing 60% in a matter of weeks and #toiletpapergate and #toiletpapercrisis suddenly trending on social media…CLICK for complete article

The Oil Price War Won’t Dethrone The Dollar

With the oil price war between Saudi Arabia and Russia showing no signs of relenting, some analysts are now warning that the standoff could extend much longer.  Saudi policy now appears to revolve around inflicting pain on both OPEC and non-OPEC producers over the short term, with a long-term view to returning to its former role as the swing producer and price setter.

With the Arab nation recently claiming that it’s ‘very comfortable’ with $30 oil, it might make good on its threat to maintain a 12 million bpd output clip for a whole year with minimal increase in spending by drawing upon its considerable reserves.

Given this backdrop, some pundits are now beginning to seriously consider the specter of a collapse by the decades-old petrodollar system. With Saudi Arabia–a key U.S. ally upon which the petrodollar was founded–having thrown the gauntlet on the U.S., a collapse by the petrodollar system could mean mass devaluations across major oil-producing regions.

But what are the odds that this could become a reality any time soon? CLICK for complete article