Current Affairs

Chinese Military Bans Tesla Vehicles Over Camera Concerns

 

Could there be trouble brewing in Elon Musk’s communist paradise?

(Reuters) – The Chinese military banned Tesla cars from entering military housing complexes, citing security concerns over the cameras installed on the vehicles, according to two people who saw notices of the directive.

The order issued by the military advises Tesla owners to park their cars outside of military property, Bloomberg had earlier reported, adding that the ban was notified to residents of military housing this week.

Separately, the Wall Street Journal reported that China’s government was restricting the use of the company’s cars by personnel at military, state-owned enterprises in sensitive industries and key agencies, as they could be a source of national security leaks.

It was not immediately clear whether the measure applied to all such facilities.

Read More

 

 

Greensill Capital was headed for a $40B IPO before imploding. What happened?

 

Meet Lex Greensill.

He founded Greensill Capital to disrupt supply-chain finance, an industry that supports $7T in global trade activity.

As reported by the Wall Street Journal, Greensill — with a big investment from SoftBank — was potentially headed for a $40B IPO last year. Instead, it just declared bankruptcy, sending shock waves through global finance.

First, what is supply-chain finance (SCF)?

Imagine you are a manufacturer that sells widgets to a car company (CarCo). Typically, you will give CarCo 90-120 days to pay off its goods invoice.

Waiting for money sucks, though.

Enter a supply-chain financier, usually big banks. Let’s say the invoice is $1k. The financier offers to buy it from you for $990 upfront and — when CarCo pays the bill later on — it profits $10.

This type of financing is low margin and reserved for big business

The JPMorgans of the world will do it as a way to upsell other services.

From a young age, Lex Greensill was obsessed with making SCF more accessible. He grew up on his family’s Australian melon farm and saw how long (sometimes 1yr+) it took his parents to turn crops into money.

After doing SCF lending at Morgan Stanley, he launched Greensill Capital in 2011 to create a platform that would make such financing available to more people.

To break into the industry, he cut corners…

… by giving lax lending terms and providing money to nontraditional clients (skyscraper builders, plane leasing companies).

His most controversial deals included:

  • Opaque loans to UK steel magnate Sanjeev Gupta
  • Self-dealing with other SoftBank portfolio companies

Greensill’s portfolio was filled with time bombs

It all imploded on March 1, when a required insurance policy lapsed and the insurer refused to renew it. A week later, Greensill declared the business insolvent.

Here are some of those taking the biggest Ls:

  • German citizens: 26 towns across Germany linked to a Greensill-owned bank may lose $300m+ in deposits.
  • SoftBank: After a scorching hot run of investments (Coupang, DoorDash), Masayoshi Son has another WeWork on his hands and will write down its $2B investment.
  • Citi: The global bank has assets in a $10B supply-chain fund related to Greensill frozen.

Regulators, investors, and borrowers are only now starting to dig through the mess (a coal company owned by West Virginia’s governor just sued).

Keep an eye on this space… there’s sure to be more news to come.

 

 

The Top 20 Countries for Ultra High Net Worth Individuals

 

Despite the global hardships of the COVID-19 pandemic, the world’s ultra high net worth (UHNW) population increased by 2.4% in 2020, reaching an all-time high of 521,653.

In this chart, we’ve used data from The Wealth Report 2021 by Knight Frank to list the 20 countries with the most UHNW individuals.

Read More

 

Chinese companies testing a workaround to Apples privacy features to track iPhones w/o permission

 

TikTok wants to keep tracking iPhone users with state-backed workaround

Some of China’s biggest technology companies, including ByteDance and Tencent, are testing a tool to bypass Apple’s new privacy rules and continue tracking iPhone users without their consent to serve them targeted mobile advertisements.

Apple is expected in the coming weeks to roll out changes it announced last June to iPhones that it says will give users more privacy. Until now, apps have been able to rely on Apple’s IDFA system to see who clicks on ads and which apps are downloaded.

In the future, they will have to ask permission to gather tracking data, a change that is expected to deal a multibillion-dollar bombshell to the online advertising industry and has been fought by Facebook, since most users are expected to decline to be tracked.

In response, the state-backed China Advertising Association, which has 2,000 members, has launched a new way to track and identify iPhone users called CAID, which is being widely tested by tech companies and advertisers in the country.

Read More