Lifestyle

Internet Browser Market Share (1996–2019)

Web browsers are a ubiquitous part of the internet experience and one of the most commonly used digital tools of the modern era.

Since the first rudimentary interfaces were created in the 1990s, a number of browsers have entered the market, with a select few achieving market dominance over our access to web content.

Today’s bar chart race video, by the YouTube channel Data is Beautiful, is a nostalgic look back at how people used to access the internet, from Mosaic to Chrome.

The First Wave of Browsers

Simply put, web browsers are the software applications that act as our portal to the internet. Today, aside from the occasional pop-up box, we barely notice them. In the early ’90s though, when the web was in its infancy, the crude, boxy interfaces were a revolutionary step in making the internet usable to people with access to a computer.

The first step in this journey came in 1990, when the legendary Tim Berners-Lee developed the first-ever web browser called “WorldWideWeb” – later renamed Nexus. Nexus was a graphical user interface (GUI) that allowed users to view text on web pages. Images were still beyond reach, but since most connections were dial-up, that wasn’t much of a limitation at the time….CLICK for complete article

Ken Jennings Becomes Jeopardy’s ‘Greatest Of All Time’

“Jeopardy! The Greatest of All Time” series will end three days ahead of its schedule, as Ken Jennings clinched the title on Tuesday with three matches remaining.

What Happened

Jennings registered his third win in four games to beat opponents Brad Rutter and James Holzhauer and get the $1 million cash prize. The other two will get $250,000 each. The longest winning streak record holder, with 74 games, had won the first and third matches, with Holzhauer grabbing the second one and Rutter remaining winless at the end of the series….CLICK for complete article

Eight Remarkable Inventions Unveiled at This Year’s CES

From a smart grill to a bike that rides on water, these were the coolest—and strangest—gadgets at the Consumer Electronics Show.

For more than half a century, the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) has been the place for companies and inventors to display their newest and coolest gadgets and gear, and for investors and trend-spotters to take a gander at the technology of the future. Often, the most successful reveals will become part of our everyday lives.

Now-iconic items unveiled at past CES events include the VCR (1970), the camcorder (1981) and the Xbox (2001). Which inventions from this year’s CES, held this week in Las Vegas, will become as popular? Here are our picks for some of the most interesting, innovative, and simply smile-worthy entries. CLICK to see the Smithsonian’s picks

Brick & Mortar Meltdown at the Movies

There are many ways to watch movies these days without having to go to a brick-and-mortar movie theater. And it shows. Despite population growth and all the efforts by movie theaters to stay relevant – such as offering extra-comfy chairs and adding bars and allowing people to bring those drinks into the theater – ticket sales continue to zig-zag lower. It seems nothing is working to stem the long-term decline.

Movie ticket sales fell 5.2% in 2019 to 1.244 billion tickets, according to movie data provider The Numbers. This is a 21% plunge from the peak in 2002, when 1.58 billion tickets were sold, and a 14% drop from 20 years ago in 1999, and just a hair above where ticket sales had been in 1995…CLICK for complete article

Tesla’s Largest Competitor Is Hidden In Plain Sight

The Tesla Cybertruck is getting the enthusiasm CEO Elon Musk had hoped for, bragging that 200,000 pre-orders have already been placed for the futuristic electric pickup launched Thursday night. But he’s yet to respond to Nikola Motors CEO Trevor Milton’s offer to share his company’s even cooler fuel cell pickup design to reach a “broader market.”

Nikola Motors is at the center of a surge in support for hydrogen and fuel cell vehicles that had been missing. Musk for years has dismissed and ridiculed hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, but the truck segment is grabbing hold of it — along with cleantech and green power advocates — who had previously always chosen electric vehicles over fuel cell. Consulting firm Cleantech Group calls it a new path to “decarbonize transportation.”

Nikola, Toyota, and Hyundai are being given credit for opening up the “hydrogen highway” through what they’re bringing out in hydrogen-powered commercial trucks. Daimler Trucks, Kenworth, and truck engine maker Cummins are also entering the race. Fuel cell buses are another segment gaining support….CLICK for complete article

The 10 most desired tech gifts of the 1970s, year by year

From Atari to the DustBuster, gadgets were awesome in the 1970s.

The Seventies were truly the start of the digital age. Electric watches and calculators glowed with red LED displays. Video arcades began to replace pinball. Television and cameras were suddenly pocket-sized. You could record The Love Boat and watch it later.

Some people have to have the latest gadget. As soon as it hits the stores. The following items may not have all been the best-selling items that…Click here for full article.